As Grid problem solving flows smoothly

December 22, 2005

By developing the architecture to run Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) applications on the Grid, the IST programme-funded initiative has provided industrial and academic users with the ability to solve complex problems without the need to invest in the costly parallel computing infrastructure that would otherwise be necessary.

"There is a vast market of users out there who only need to use CFD applications occasionally and it makes no sense for them to acquire high performance processing systems," explains project manager Norberto Fueyo at the University of Zaragoza in Spain.

Such users could be architects looking to calculate the wind flow around a building, a train manufacturer trying to determine the aerodynamics of a new design or even a medical researcher attempting to simulate blood pressure in an artery.

"With Grid computing they can acquire the processing power they need when they need it and only for how long they need it to run their calculations," Fueyo says.

The FlowGrid architecture provides them with that ability through Grid middleware that allows users to find available clusters of processors, run their calculations and obtain results in potentially less time than with parallel systems. Because CFD problems are typically broken down into a mesh of cells to model fluid dynamics, the added resources of the Grid also permit greater precision in the calculations.

"More cells require more resources but also result in more precise output," Fueyo notes. "The scalability of the Grid allows a user to run calculations on one million cells or tens of millions of cells - much more than most parallel computing systems can handle."

It is also considerably cheaper. A cost analysis carried out by the project concluded that it would cost a typical industrial user as little as 10 to 20 euros to solve a standard CFD problem over the Grid, compared to the thousands it costs to buy high performance processors.

The architecture was evaluated in four test cases run by the consortium's four industrial users who employed it to simulate train aerodynamics, ship hydrodynamics, diesel exhaust and gas combustion. Many of the partners are continuing to use the architecture, Fueyo notes, and one of them, British company Symban, is currently in the process of commercialising it.

Source: IST Results

Explore further: Simulation system provides integrated approach to crop and climate change models

Related Stories

Mapping PakistanÂ’'s power grid

September 1, 2015

Charging your mobile phone at night is an act millions of people across the world do every day, almost unthinkingly. Yet this assumes a reliable power supply is available, something which many of us take for granted.

Researchers building high-speed data 'freeway system'

August 5, 2015

For the last three years, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has made a series of competitive grants to over 100 U.S. universities to aggressively upgrade their campus network capacity for greatly enhanced science data ...

Recommended for you

What are white holes?

October 9, 2015

Black holes are created when stars die catastrophically in a supernova. So what in the universe is a white hole?

Horn of Africa drying ever faster as climate warms

October 9, 2015

The Horn of Africa has become increasingly arid in sync with the global and regional warming of the last century and at a rate unprecedented in the last 2,000 years, according to new research led by a University of Arizona ...

Could 'The Day After Tomorrow' happen?

October 9, 2015

A researcher from the University of Southampton has produced a scientific study of the climate scenario featured in the disaster movie 'The Day After Tomorrow'.

A mission to a metal world—The Psyche mission

October 9, 2015

In their drive to set exploration goals for the future, NASA's Discovery Program put out the call for proposals for their thirteenth Discovery mission in February 2014. After reviewing the 27 initial proposals, a panel of ...

The universe's most miraculous molecule

October 9, 2015

It's the second most abundant substance in the universe. It dissolves more materials than any other solvent. It stores incredible amounts of energy. Life as we know it would not be possible without it. And although it covers ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.