Feds and Dell to recycle electronics

December 1, 2005

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Dell Inc. will hold a one-day recycling event in New Orleans for equipment destroyed by Hurricane Katrina.

Officials say people living in the New Orleans area can drop off any brand of old or unwanted electronics units -- including computer equipment, televisions, VCRs, DVD players, radios and similar electronics -- to be recycled, without charge.

The one-day, free electronics recycling event will be held Saturday at the area's Pontchartrain Center. EPA officials will then evaluate whether such procedures can become an effective part of the regional clean up efforts.

Dell said it will accept any make or model of computer and related equipment, including monitors, printers, scanners, keyboards, mice, laptops and cables. The EPA will accept other electronic equipment, including TVs, VCRs, DVD players and radios.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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