Analysts: wireless tech needs to be easy

December 15, 2005

Consumers are becoming less dazzled by wireless technology and more demanding of user friendliness, a new analysis concluded Thursday.

West Technology Research Solutions said the predominant growth in the wireless market will come in the home, where consumers will be attracted to ease of use and low costs.

"The companies with the products that solve real customer needs and desires will likely become the standard in the home market," said WTRS analyst Kirsten West.

Home wireless applications are expected to grow in popularity, particularly as new homes become increasingly equipped with built-in sensors for wireless applications.

A lack of standardization in the wireless mesh sector means that the door is open for the design of increasingly simplified applications, an attribute that WTRS found was more appealing to consumers than the "gee whiz" aspect of more-complicated gadgets.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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