Tighter review of owl habitat rejected

November 10, 2005

Washington state's Forest Practices Board has rejected a request to more closely study timber cutting in the spotted owl's remaining habitat.

The board's Wednesday ruling turned back a plan for meticulous environmental reviews of logging on approximately 115,000 acres designated for "special emphasis" in helping the endangered bird.

The state of Washington has 7.8 million acres of private forestland containing roughly 178,000 acres of spotted owl habitat, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer reported, noting wildlife officials aren't sure how many owls remain, but they say two-thirds of nesting sites identified a decade ago have been abandoned.

Instead of the reviews, the board urged environmentalists, timber companies, Indian tribes and the government to resolve their differences with the help of a professional "facilitator."

The ruling was not applauded by environment groups.

"They didn't do anything that will change anything on the ground by the time the birds' nesting season starts March 1," Nina Carter, executive director of Audubon Washington, told the Post-Intelligencer.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Flies released to attack hemlock-killing pest

Related Stories

Report: Diversity of New England plant life is threatened

March 26, 2015

From picturesque coastal estuaries of Cape Cod to the soaring White Mountains, much of New England's rich native flora is fighting for survival against increasing odds, according to what conservationists call the most comprehensive ...

Rediscovering Ireland's rich history of wild plants​

March 16, 2015

Ireland lost one million souls to hunger and disease during the potato famine and another million to immigration. But that's not all, says Peter Wyse Jackson, PhD, president of the Missouri Botanical Garden and the George ...

Government to spend $3.2 million to help monarch butterfly

February 9, 2015

The federal government on Monday pledged $3.2 million to help save the monarch butterfly, the iconic orange-and-black butterfly that can migrate thousands of miles between the U.S. and Mexico each year. In recent years, the ...

Recommended for you

Astronomers find star with three super-Earths

July 30, 2015

Astronomers said Thursday they had found a planetary system with three super-Earths orbiting a bright, dwarf star—one of them likely a volcanic world of molten rock.

Robotic insect mimics nature's extreme moves

July 30, 2015

The concept of walking on water might sound supernatural, but in fact it is a quite natural phenomenon. Many small living creatures leverage water's surface tension to maneuver themselves around. One of the most complex maneuvers, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.