Poll: People reluctant to buy cloned food

Nov 16, 2005

A survey indicates Americans are uneasy about cloned food products, with 43 percent believing such food would be unsafe to eat.

The poll, conducted on behalf of the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology, suggests animal breeders and food producers could face resistance as they try to commercialize the technology.

Most scientists, including a panel of the National Academy of Sciences, believe food products from clones would be safe, and studies have shown it can't be distinguished from normal food, The Washington Post reported Wednesday, noting the Food and Drug Administration is reviewing the issue and has said it is likely to approve milk from clones and meat from their offspring.

The poll concerning cloned products involved 1,000 adults interviewed by telephone Oct. 10-16 and one of the largest to date to ask questions about cloning and food.

Although half of the public opposes genetic modification of plant crops, they apparently do not realize such crops have been on the market for more than a decade and most packaged foods contain cloned products, the Post reported.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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