Online shoppers concered about credit info

November 15, 2005

A majority of consumers in a recent survey reported they are worried about credit security while shopping online during the holiday season.

According to a survey released by payment solutions company I4 Commerce on Tuesday, 72 percent of respondents were concerned about providing online retailers with their credit-card information in light of recent news about identity theft.

Other highlights of the holiday shopping survey include:

-- Sixty-four percent of consumers responding to the survey -- mainly affluent, frequent online shoppers who have made purchases from a number of online retailers -- indicated that they would be more likely to make a purchase if they did not have to give their credit-card number to a retailer.

-- When asked about their payment preferences, consumers said that they preferred being billed later for their purchases almost twice as much as using other payment methods, such as eChecks, credit cards, PayPal and checking accounts, combined.

-- More than 58 percent of shoppers plan to do a combination of shopping online and at retail stores this holiday season. More than 30 percent plan to shop entirely online, which represents more than 60 million Americans making all their holiday purchases online this year.

"Consumers are increasingly concerned about the safety of presenting their financial information online and would like payment choices. It is up to the retailers to address these concerns and look at new alternatives for making shopping safer, faster and easier," said Vince Talbert, vice president of marketing for I4 Commerce. "Retailers that take this into account and offer their customers new payment options can strengthen their relationship with existing customers while attracting valuable new online shoppers."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Why working mothers go freelance in corporate world

Related Stories

Why working mothers go freelance in corporate world

August 23, 2016

The original "freelancers" were historic knights and mercenaries, selling their fighting skills to whoever paid the right price. Today's freelancers include a growing army of people who decide to leave highly paid and secure ...

Google offers mail payment service in the UK

February 7, 2015

(Phys.org) —You already are accustomed to attaching lots of items in your emails. Pictures. Portfolios. Contracts. Resumes. White papers. For those in the UK there's something else as well. You can not only send a friend ...

Singles Day: China's online shopping holiday

November 11, 2012

(AP)—Lei Shujie, a designer in Shanghai, piled up a wish list for Sunday, a quirky holiday dubbed "Singles Day" that has grown into China's—and possibly the world's—busiest online shopping day.

EBay 4Q revenue rises, helped by holiday shoppers

January 19, 2011

(AP) -- EBay Inc. said Wednesday that its fourth-quarter revenue rose 5 percent, as the healthy holiday shopping season bolstered growth in its online marketplace and PayPal online payments business.

EBay holiday forecast disappoints investors

October 20, 2011

(AP) -- EBay left investors unimpressed with its predictions for the holiday season even as its namesake site and PayPal online payment service showed healthy growth in the latest quarter.

Recommended for you

Smarter brains are blood-thirsty brains

August 30, 2016

A University of Adelaide-led project has overturned the theory that the evolution of human intelligence was simply related to the size of the brain—but rather linked more closely to the supply of blood to the brain.

Theorists solve a long-standing fundamental problem

August 30, 2016

Trying to understand a system of atoms is like herding gnats - the individual atoms are never at rest and are constantly moving and interacting. When it comes to trying to model the properties and behavior of these kinds ...

Reconstructing the sixth century plague from a victim

August 30, 2016

Before the infamous Black Death, the first great plague epidemic was the Justinian plague, which, over the course of two centuries, wiped out up to an estimated 50 million (15 percent) of the world's population throughout ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.