NASA joins with firms to inspire students

Nov 10, 2005

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is joining with several companies in an effort to interest students in science and mathematics careers.

NASA announced Wednesday it is partnering with the motion picture firm Columbia TriStar Marketing of Culver City, Calif., and the Houghton Mifflin Co. in Boston.

The goal of the partnership is to create resources for educators that spark student imagination, encourage interest in space exploration and enhance the elementary science curriculum. Schools will benefit from educational materials that tie into science concepts featured in the book and the new movie "Zathura."

Working with Scholastic Magazine, the partnership developed a program entitled "Space Science: Adventure Is Waiting." The educational program uses fantasy concepts from "Zathura" as a way to explain real science. The material includes posters and classroom activities.

"Zathura" is a story by Chris Van Allsburg. A New York Times Bestseller in 2003, it is a fictional story about children who find themselves on an outer space adventure.

The partners' message is that students who pursue careers in science, technology, engineering or mathematics could live their own future outer-space adventure.

The movie opens nationwide Friday.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Mapping the world's linguistic diversity—scientists discover links between your genes and the language you speak

Related Stories

NASA maps beach tar from California oil pipeline spill

Jul 02, 2015

When an on-land pipeline ruptured north of Santa Barbara, California, on May 19—spilling 105,000 barrels of crude oil onto Refugio State Beach and about 21,000 gallons of oil into the Pacific Ocean in the ...

Recommended for you

Lady, you're on the money

Jul 03, 2015

So far, women whose portraits appear on U.S. money have been a party of three. Excluding commemorative currency, only Sacagawea, Susan B. Anthony and Helen Keller appear on coins in general circulation, according ...

Old World monkey had tiny, complex brain

Jul 03, 2015

The brain hidden inside the oldest known Old World monkey skull has been visualized for the first time. The creature's tiny but remarkably wrinkled brain supports the idea that brain complexity can evolve ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.