NASA joins with firms to inspire students

November 10, 2005

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is joining with several companies in an effort to interest students in science and mathematics careers.

NASA announced Wednesday it is partnering with the motion picture firm Columbia TriStar Marketing of Culver City, Calif., and the Houghton Mifflin Co. in Boston.

The goal of the partnership is to create resources for educators that spark student imagination, encourage interest in space exploration and enhance the elementary science curriculum. Schools will benefit from educational materials that tie into science concepts featured in the book and the new movie "Zathura."

Working with Scholastic Magazine, the partnership developed a program entitled "Space Science: Adventure Is Waiting." The educational program uses fantasy concepts from "Zathura" as a way to explain real science. The material includes posters and classroom activities.

"Zathura" is a story by Chris Van Allsburg. A New York Times Bestseller in 2003, it is a fictional story about children who find themselves on an outer space adventure.

The partners' message is that students who pursue careers in science, technology, engineering or mathematics could live their own future outer-space adventure.

The movie opens nationwide Friday.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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