U.S. lawmakers push, chide 'tech agenda'

November 16, 2005

The "technology agenda" unveiled Tuesday by Democratic lawmakers is receiving mixed reviews from Congress and the industry.

The proposal parallels many previous tech-industry priorities; however, rival Republicans chided the plan as ignoring supposedly vital measures such as tort reform and a free-trade pact with Central America.

"When given the chance to support policies that actually would encourage competitiveness and create opportunities for American businesses and consumers, they have been almost exclusively in the 'no' column,'' sniffed Rep. David Dreier, R-Calif.

The San Jose Mercury News said the reaction from Silicon Valley was largely favorable. The industry cheered such provisions as encouraging the expansion of high-speed Internet services in the United States, more aid to research and assistance for smaller tech companies.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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