International Space Station orbit changed

November 10, 2005
International Space Station (ISS)

The crew aboard the International Space Station has successfully completed an orbit correction, raising it by slightly less than five miles.

The maneuver, supervised by NASA, was the first after a failed attempt Oct. 19 when it was planned to lift it by six miles. The engines were then supposed to work for about 25 minutes during two stages. However, they disconnected after 78 seconds, Russia's Novosti news agency reported.

The current ISS crew consists of Russian Valery Tokarev and American William McArthur.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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