IBM joins in cancer research, diagnosis

Nov 09, 2005

The IBM Corp. announced Tuesday it is joining forces with several research centers to help accelerate cancer research, diagnosis and treatment.

IBM, based in Armonk, N.Y., said it will collaborate with the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, the Molecular Profiling Institute and the CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center under separate agreements.

IBM and Sloan-Kettering will build a state-of-the-art integrated information management system to improve the ability of clinicians and researchers to study long-term cancer-related illnesses, identify disease trends and determine success rates.

"This is an excellent multi-sector model that can drive integration of molecular medicine into areas where it's truly needed, including cancer detection, treatment, and ultimately prevention," said Dr. Anna Barker, deputy director of the National Cancer Institute. "The convergence of advanced technologies and post-genomics science will change cancer medicine in ways we cannot yet envision."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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