'Harry Potter' Goes To Space

November 24, 2005

"Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire," the new blockbuster movie based on the series of books by J.K. Rowling, is having its space premiere.

The movie was transmitted from Mission Control in Houston Tuesday to NASA astronaut and International Space Station Commander Bill McArthur, who asked to see the movie. As part of NASA's regular assistance to crew members on long-duration space flights, NASA contacted the maker of the Harry Potter movies, Warner Bros. Pictures, in the hopes that they might work some magic and help McArthur see the film while in space. Together they worked to send the film to McArthur.

International Space Station crew members have busy work schedules during most of their time in space, but they also have a little scheduled downtime. Over the years, the station has compiled a DVD movie library, along with books, magazines, CDs, and other materials to help the astronauts relax.

McArthur and Russian cosmonaut Valery Tokarev make up the 12th crew of the station, a unique testbed for longer-duration to the moon and to Mars.

Source: NASA

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