Firm field tests micro-power broadband

November 4, 2005

A Florida company has successfully completed the first field tests of xMax, a long-range signal technique that uses extremely low amounts of power.

xG Technology said Friday it used a simple VHF paging channel to deliver data more than a mile at ground level and delivered a major blow to common wisdom that much higher power levels are required for WiFi performance.

"Demonstrating that broadband wireless communications can occur at such micro-power levels in the presence of interfering signals overturns long-held industry ideas," said xG President Joe Bobier. "What is really exciting is that xMax's unique signal profile is a perfect fit for low frequency channels that have been previously unsuitable for wireless broadband."

xG said in a news release that standard 802.11 WiFi hot spots require 1 watt of power while its xMax functions on .0005 watts, allowing it to operate on low frequencies currently unusable for WiFi.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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