Ericsson, UNDP work on mobile networks

November 16, 2005

Ericsson said it will work with the United Nations Development Program in an effort to shrink the digital divide.

The Swedish telecommunications group said that it will work with UNDP as well as the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency to optimize mobile coverage to rural users. The first case study of the system was conducted in Tanzania.

"The best way to impact poverty is to stimulate the local economy. This partnership is unique because it is one of the first cases where we see a solution to poverty that is founded in market-based incentives and new business models to reach the poor. In this case we are, together with Ericsson, promoting access to telecommunications, which has proven to support sustainable development. UNDP's role has been to facilitate the business development process and ensure trust and buy-in from local stakeholders," said Bruce Jenks, the UNDP's assistant secretary-general.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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