U.S. EPA helps to clean Beijing air

November 24, 2005

U.S.-supported Chinese scientists have outlined strategies to dramatically reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and other air pollutants in Beijing.
The recommendations come in preparation for the 2008 Summer Olympics.

The team said with clean energy technologies and policies in Beijing, the city could reduce annual emissions of carbon dioxide by up to 22 percent in 2010. Output of health-impairing particulate matter could be cut by up to 40 percent each year.

The Beijing project is part of a larger effort by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to work with China and other developing nations to promote environmental sustainability.

EPA officials said they will expand such efforts through the new Asia Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate.'

The partnership, to be formally launched in January at a ministerial conference in Australia, will include China, India, Australia, Japan and South Korea.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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