Bulletin of Atomic Scientists 60 years old

November 30, 2005

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists celebrates its 60th anniversary Saturday with ceremonies in Chicago.

The celebration will include a public forum on doomsday and a screening of Stanley Kubrick's 1964 film "Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb."

On Aug. 7, 1945, the day after the United States dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, scientists working on the Manhattan Project at the University of Chicago organized the Atomic Scientists of Chicago to campaign for the peaceful use of nuclear power under international control.

Three of the scientists co-founded the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, with the first issue appearing Dec. 10, 1945.

The Bulletin soon gave birth to the Doomsday Clock, which has become a widely recognized icon symbolizing the threat of nuclear weapons and other dangers to global security.

The publication still makes its home on the University of Chicago campus and has become a leading resource for information about weapons of mass destruction, international security issues, the arms trade and the nuclear industry.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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