Briefs: Apple secures memory supply to 2010

November 21, 2005

Apple said Monday it has reached agreements with manufacturers to secure the supply of memory chips through to 2010.

The company said that it has reached supply agreements with Hynix, Intel, Micron, Samsung Electronics and Toshiba to ensure a steady flow of NAND flash memory. Apple will pay in advance a total of $1.25 billion over the next three months to ensure the supply.

"We want to be able to produce as many of our wildly popular iPods as the market demands," Apple Chief Executive Steve Jobs said in a news release.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Samsung chief stresses 'fair' competition with Apple

Related Stories

Apple's victory means soul-searching for Samsung

August 28, 2012

A U.S. jury's $1 billion verdict against Samsung for what rival Apple claimed was the illegal copying of its iPhone and iPad designs signals a turning point for the South Korean electronics giant known for its prowess in ...

Apple surpasses HP as largest buyer of chips

June 8, 2011

(AP) -- Driven by the success of the iPhone and iPad, Apple Inc. has become the world's largest buyer of chips for computers and phones, a research firm said Wednesday.

Thailand flooding could affect PC supplies, prices

October 19, 2011

(AP) -- The personal computer industry, already reeling from depressed demand, has been dealt another setback: Massive flooding in Thailand has curtailed production of a critical component - computer storage drives.

Recommended for you

A mission to a metal world—The Psyche mission

October 9, 2015

In their drive to set exploration goals for the future, NASA's Discovery Program put out the call for proposals for their thirteenth Discovery mission in February 2014. After reviewing the 27 initial proposals, a panel of ...

Threat posed by 'pollen thief' bees uncovered

October 9, 2015

A new University of Stirling study has uncovered the secrets of 'pollen thief' bees - which take pollen from flowers but fail to act as effective pollinators - and the threat they pose to certain plant species.

A better way to read the genome

October 9, 2015

UConn researchers have sequenced the RNA of the most complicated gene known in nature, using a hand-held sequencer no bigger than a cell phone.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.