U.S. wireless users more willing to switch

October 5, 2005

American wireless subscribers are becoming more willing to switch carriers if they become unhappy with their retail purchase, a new survey revealed Wednesday.

J.D. Power and Associates found in its second annual Wireless Retail Sales Satisfaction Study that the chances of customers who are dissatisfied with their retail experience switching service providers had jumped 46 percent from last year, reflecting increasing competition in the retail wireless sector.

"With fewer new customers entering the market, the wireless industry is becoming fiercely competitive for retailers," said J.D. Power's Kirk Parsons. "It's imperative that wireless service providers concentrate on retention strategies, as the ability to expand the customer base becomes more difficult."

The survey also found high-pressure sales tactics by store staff to be the greatest irritant to customers, and unhappy customers were less likely to return to a retail store or recommend the company to friends and family.

The good news is that major retailers Verizon and T-Mobile earned high marks for satisfaction in the survey of consumers who had completed a retail sale in the past six months.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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