Samsung Intros SGH-D307 Messaging Phone

October 28, 2005

Samsung today announced the availability of the multi-functional designed SGH-d307, which features a swivel display that morphs the clamshell phone into a virtual mini-laptop. With a quick flip of the screen, the d307's numeric keypad becomes a full QWERTY keyboard, unveiling a productive messaging device for users to send and receive emails and instant messages on the fly.

The d307's large internal display features a 262K-color TFT screen, making it easy to view and move from one message to another. Its integrated EDGE technology takes advantage of faster connection speeds, allowing quick and efficient browsing of HTML pages and navigation of emails, and the internal antenna keeps the lines of the device smooth and unobtrusive, without compromising network reception.

Packed with an array of advanced communication features, the d307 includes advanced voice recognition with VoiceMode speech-to-text dictation technology and voice-enabled dialing, as well as a speakerphone and Bluetooth wireless technology support. Additionally, the phone includes multimedia messaging for sending pictures, animation and sound files. "The d307's breakthrough design showcases Samsung's ability to embed real-life, relevant technologies in sleek, user-friendly packages," said Peter Skarzynski, senior vice president, Samsung. "With the increased popularity of messaging, products such as the d307 will resonate with consumers, meeting their ultimate communication needs."


Additional features of the d307 include:

-- EDGE, Class 10
-- GSM: Tri-Band 850/1800/1900 MHz
-- Bluetooth wireless technology support:
- Profiles supported: headset, hands-free, file transfer, dial-up networking
-- Cingular Mobile eMail
-- AOL, ICQ and Yahoo! Instant Messaging
-- Internal Display: 262K-color TFT; 176 x 220 pixel
-- External Display: 4 Grey Scale; 96 x 96 pixel
-- Weighs 4.3 ounces; Measures 3.7 x 1.9 x 0.85 inches
-- MP3 ringtones and 64 note polyphonic ringtones
-- T-9 easy text entry
-- Wireless Internet access
-- Wireless modem capable
-- Java support
-- Tone, image and ringer download
-- Integrated games
-- Trilingual user interface: English, Spanish and French
-- Voice recorder
-- Personal information manager
- Calendar, calculator, alarm clock, to do list, currency converter, world time

Source: Samsung

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