Prince Charles speaks about climate change

October 27, 2005

Prince Charles says climate change should be seen as the "greatest challenge to face man" and treated as a much bigger priority in Britain.

The prince, during an exclusive BBC interview, said climate change is "what really worries me," and does not want his future grandchildren to ask why he did not act on the issue.

The Prince of Wales spoke with BBC reporters at his farm in Gloucestershire.

"We should be treating, I think, the whole issue of climate change and global warming with a far greater degree of priority than I think is happening now," he said, noting action had to be taken to ensure "there was something left to hand on" to future generations.

He said factors such as climate change, global warming and the cost of fuel could make things "very complicated" in the future.

But environmentalist writer George Monbiot told the BBC he would have given Prince Charles more credit if he had pledged to get rid of his private plane and helicopter, as well as move into a smaller house "rather than using two homes which use about the same amount of energy as a medium sized town."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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