Nortel to beef up Trinidad-Tobago wireless

October 11, 2005

The islands of Trinidad and Tobago will soon be hooked up to 3G wireless broadband under an agreement between the country's main telecom company and Nortel.

Telecommunications Services of Trinidad and Tobago said in a release it had a goal of becoming the "wireless high-speed data leader" in the Caribbean islands that rely largely on international tourism and energy production.

"Nortel's CDMA2000 1X and 1xEV-DO technology will enable us to deliver wireless data services and applications customers need to use for business, and also applications associated with information and entertainment like Internet Protocol Television," said TSTT Vice President Karamchand Perai.

The planned network will boost current connectivity speeds about tenfold to 2.4 megabits per second and make available high-speed services such as video and EV-DO enabled PDAs.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: What is the best solution to universalize 30 Mbps broadband?

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