NOAA tests for Gulf of Mexico contaminates

October 26, 2005

U.S. officials say tests of white shrimp samples collected the week of Sept. 12 from the Mississippi Sound found no elevated contaminants.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Wednesday it collected 23 samples of white shrimp from Mobile Bay to Lake Borgne two weeks after Hurricane Katrina hit the U.S. Gulf Coast. The samples were tested for hydrocarbon exposure due to oil spills or urban runoffs, and other contaminants, such as PCBs and DDTs.

Scientists said their analyses found PCB levels les than 5 parts per billion and DDT levels less than 2 ppb -- both well within U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines for consumption.

NOAA also tested samples of shrimp caught prior to Hurricane Katrina and found similarly low levels of toxins.

Federal scientists are currently analyzing samples collected the week of Sept. 26 and on Oct. 17 from areas most likely to have been affected by delayed releases of toxic substances, such as the mouth of the Mississippi River and the western Mississippi Sound, where water from Lake Pontchartrain enters the Gulf of Mexico.

NOAA said it will collect and test samples at least through the end of the year to monitor environmental changes.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Ice sample from Greenland and Russia provide clues to past and future climate change

Related Stories

Getting the lead out

September 22, 2015

Caltech geochemist Clair Patterson (1922–1995) helped galvanize the environmental movement 50 years ago when he announced that highly toxic lead could be found essentially everywhere on Earth, including in our own bodies—and ...

Scientists optimize breeding management for European minks

September 22, 2015

The European mink (Mustela lutreola) is one of the most endangered mammals in Europe. The reasons for its decline are the destruction of its habitat in riparian areas, competition with the alien American mink and historically, ...

Recommended for you

Using optical fiber to generate a two-micron laser

October 9, 2015

Lasers with a wavelength of two microns could move the boundaries of surgery and molecule detection. Researchers at EPFL have managed to generate such lasers using a simple and inexpensive method.

Gene editing: Research spurs debate over promise vs. ethics

October 9, 2015

The hottest tool in biology has scientists using words like revolutionary as they describe the long-term potential: wiping out certain mosquitoes that carry malaria, treating genetic diseases like sickle-cell, preventing ...

ZomBee Watch helps scientists track honeybee killer

October 9, 2015

While scientists have documented cases of tiny flies infesting honeybees, causing the bees to lurch and stagger around like zombies before they die, researchers don't know the scope of the problem.

Ancient genome from Africa sequenced for the first time

October 8, 2015

The first ancient human genome from Africa to be sequenced has revealed that a wave of migration back into Africa from Western Eurasia around 3,000 years ago was up to twice as significant as previously thought, and affected ...

On soft ground? Tread lightly to stay fast

October 8, 2015

These findings, reported today, Friday 9th October, in the journal Bioinspiration & Biomechanics, offer a new insight into how animals respond to different terrain, and how robots can learn from them.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.