Study: Neural stem cells are long-lived

October 5, 2005

New York University researchers have determined immature stem cells that proliferate in mice to form brain tissue are long-lived.

The research demonstrates such stem cells can function for at least a year -- most of the life span of a mouse -- and produce multiple types of neural cells, not just neurons.

Scientists say the discovery may bode well for the use of such neural stem cells to regenerate brain tissue lost to injury or disease.

Alexandra Joyner, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at New York University's School of Medicine, and her former postdoctoral fellow, Sohyun Ahn, said the technique they used to trace the fate of stem cells might also be used to understand the roles of stem cells in tissue repair and cancer progression.

The study appears in the Oct. 6 issue of the journal Nature.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Biologists induce flatworms to grow heads and brains of other species

Related Stories

Using microfluidic devices to sort stem cells

November 9, 2015

While there are no cures for neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, many researchers believe that one could be found in neural stem cells. Unfortunately, scientists do not yet have a full understanding ...

Shaping contraction

November 20, 2015

You were once a hollow shell. To sculpt that hollow ball into an organism with layers of internal organs, muscle and skin, portions of that embryonic 'shell' folded inwards. The same happens to fruit fly embryos, and researchers ...

Recommended for you

Roboticists learn to teach robots from babies

December 1, 2015

Babies learn about the world by exploring how their bodies move in space, grabbing toys, pushing things off tables and by watching and imitating what adults are doing.

Getting into the flow on the International Space Station

December 1, 2015

Think about underground water and gas as they filter through porous materials like soil and rock beds. On Earth, gravity forces water and gas to separate as they flow through the ground, cleaning the water and storing it ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.