NASA changes Boeing space station contract

October 6, 2005

Officials at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston announced a modification Wednesday to a contract with The Boeing Co.

The modification, valued at more than $94 million, consolidates work done in support of international space station payload integration activities.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration modification transfers a portion of work from one contract to another to consolidate activities. The projects include payload engineering integration; payload software integration; flight software production, and logistics support.

NASA said Boeing will continue to manage the overall space station payload integration process.

The contract covers work at NASA's Johnson Space Center, the Florida-based Kennedy Space Center, and the Marshall Space Flight Center at Huntsville, Ala.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: JPL's role in making 'Th Martian' a reality

Related Stories

JPL's role in making 'Th Martian' a reality

October 6, 2015

When fictional astronaut Mark Watney becomes stranded alone on the Red Planet in the novel and film "The Martian," people and technology from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, play important roles ...

Recommended for you

Perfectly accurate clocks turn out to be impossible

October 7, 2015

Can the passage of time be measured precisely, always and everywhere? The answer will upset many watchmakers. A team of physicists from the universities of Warsaw and Nottingham have just shown that when we are dealing with ...

The topolariton, a new half-matter, half-light particle

October 7, 2015

A new type of "quasiparticle" theorized by Caltech's Gil Refael, a professor of theoretical physics and condensed matter theory, could help improve the efficiency of a wide range of photonic devices—technologies, such as ...

How the stick insect sticks (and unsticks) itself

October 7, 2015

New research shows the fluid found on insects' feet does not help them adhere to vertical and inverted surfaces, as previously thought, but may in fact help them to unstick their feet more easily to allow greater control ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.