Hurricane hazardous waste is collected

October 31, 2005

The EPA says an estimated 1 million pounds of household hazardous waste has been collected in Louisiana in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

Environmental Protection Agency officials said the household hazardous waste typically consists of cleaning products, as well as lawn and garden products, pesticides, herbicides, fuels, paints and batteries.

"This collection milestone underscores our pledge to the people in the Gulf Coast region," said EPA Administrator Stephen Johnson. The "EPA will continue its efforts to dispose of hazardous materials and protect public health."

Scientists said most of the ordinary household products are safe when stored and used under normal circumstances, but can endanger the public when mixed.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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