EPA cuts its own energy use

Oct 08, 2005

In response to the President Bush's directive to federal agencies to conserve energy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is turning down its thermostat.

The EPA is taking immediate actions to conserve natural gas, electricity, gasoline and diesel fuel in all its Washington buildings, said EPA head Stephen L. Johnson.

Actions that EPA is taking include: adjusting the temperatures in EPA buildings to an average of 68 degrees F; removing unnecessary light bulbs in some hallways; turning off the historic fountains in the courtyard areas; and limiting courtyard lighting at night and turning it off during the day.

"Day in and day out, we at EPA are protecting our nation's shared environment and conserving our country's precious resources," Johnson said in a statement Friday. "By taking actions, both big and small, to reduce our facilities' energy usage, we are responding to the president's call to conserve and promoting the common-sense efforts we can all make as individuals to reduce our energy demand."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Short, sharp shocks let slip the stories of supernovae

Related Stories

Tapping into mine water for geothermal energy

Apr 03, 2015

Millions of miles of tunnels criss-cross the ground under old mining communities across the United States. Abandoned, falling apart and choked with water, the tunnels are often viewed as a dangerous legacy. ...

Engineers are making strides in reducing air pollution

Feb 27, 2015

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the average adult breathes 3,000 gallons of air per day—yet the same air that fuels our bodies also can harm them. In fact, inhaling certain air pollutants ...

America's place in the sun: Energy report sets goal

Dec 24, 2014

A recent energy report said that America should build on the recent growth in solar energy by setting a goal of obtaining at least 10 percent of its electricity from solar power by 2030. "Star Power: The ...

Recommended for you

How bad can solar storms get?

May 22, 2015

Our sun regularly pelts the Earth with all kinds of radiation and charged particles. How bad can these solar storms get?

Mars rover's ChemCam instrument gets sharper vision

May 22, 2015

NASA's Mars Curiosity Rover's "ChemCam" instrument just got a major capability fix, as Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists uploaded a software repair for the auto-focus system on the instrument.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.