EPA cuts its own energy use

October 8, 2005

In response to the President Bush's directive to federal agencies to conserve energy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is turning down its thermostat.

The EPA is taking immediate actions to conserve natural gas, electricity, gasoline and diesel fuel in all its Washington buildings, said EPA head Stephen L. Johnson.

Actions that EPA is taking include: adjusting the temperatures in EPA buildings to an average of 68 degrees F; removing unnecessary light bulbs in some hallways; turning off the historic fountains in the courtyard areas; and limiting courtyard lighting at night and turning it off during the day.

"Day in and day out, we at EPA are protecting our nation's shared environment and conserving our country's precious resources," Johnson said in a statement Friday. "By taking actions, both big and small, to reduce our facilities' energy usage, we are responding to the president's call to conserve and promoting the common-sense efforts we can all make as individuals to reduce our energy demand."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: US proposes methane cuts for oil and gas industry

Related Stories

Deal requires deep pollution cuts at Iowa coal-fired plants

July 15, 2015

Iowa's second largest power company agreed Wednesday to drastically cut pollution at several coal-fired power plants under a Clean Air Act settlement that's expected to make the air safer and easier to breathe around the ...

Recommended for you

Ice sheets may be more resilient than thought

September 3, 2015

Sea level rise poses one of the biggest threats to human systems in a globally warming world, potentially causing trillions of dollars' worth of damages to flooded cities around the world. As surface temperatures rise, ice ...

Long-sought chiral anomaly detected in crystalline material

September 3, 2015

A study by Princeton researchers presents evidence for a long-sought phenomenon—first theorized in the 1960s and predicted to be found in crystals in 1983—called the "chiral anomaly" in a metallic compound of sodium and ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.