Energia To Build Site For Moon Flights - Corporation President

October 28, 2005

The Russian Energia Rocket and Space Corporation is set to build a site for flights to the Moon and create a new space transport system soon, the company's president said, reports RIA Novosti.

"We hope to develop space flights in the future," Nikolai Sevastyanov said. "Our task for the near future is to carry out fundamental space research, practice long-term interplanetary flights, build a site for flights to the Moon and create a new space transport system."

Sevastyanov made the comments while welcoming the eleventh crew of the International Space Station and the third space tourist, American Gregory Olsen, home.

Expedition captain Sergei Krikalev praised the work of his crew, despite technical problems.

"We made every effort to make work and life at the station better," he said.

U.S. astronaut and flight engineer John Phillips said the language difference did not affect their work and the crew was able to accomplish their goals.

Copyright 2005 by Space Daily, Distributed United Press International

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