Canada's Rogers to start 3G wireless testing

October 14, 2005

Rogers Communications and Ericsson are set to begin trials of 3G wireless service upgrades in the Canadian market.

The companies announced Friday the tests will focus on state-of-the-art UMTS-HSDPA (Universal Mobile Telephone System -- High Speed Downlink Packet Access) that, if effective, will upgrade Rogers' nationwide network.

HSDPA is an improvement to existing UMTS 3G networks that greatly increase data speeds up to 14 megabits per second, opening doors to a variety of the latest consumer wireless applications.

"Providing the foundation for broadband wireless services and converged services to customers is a solid step in moving toward an all-communicating world," said Carl-Henric Svanberg, Ericsson's CEO.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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