Bubonic plague found in Colo. prairie dogs

October 17, 2005

Colorado health officials have reportedly confirmed an outbreak of bubonic plague among prairie dog colonies near Green Mountain.

No reports of human cases have been received, but precautions were being urged, the Denver Post reported Monday. Pet owners were advised to confine their dogs and cats to prevent contact with any species of wild rodents, especially those appearing sick or dead.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Social network research may boost prairie dog conservation efforts

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