Threatened U.K. bird species has comeback

September 24, 2005

One of Britain's most threatened bird species, the stone-curlew, has officially emerged from the brink of extinction, experts say.

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds said numbers of breeding stone-curlews in England have risen to more than 300 pairs, the Independent reported Friday.

The stone-curlew, about the length of a crow but slimmer and with much longer wings, had declined since World War II. Before the war, more than 1,000 breeding pairs were tallied in England, but following the war, the bird's habitat was lost to arable farming and forestry.

"This has been a great success story. There is no doubt that without conservation work the stone-curlew may no longer have been a U.K. breeding bird by now," said Robin Wynde, RSPB biodiversity policy officer. "It has come back from the brink."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Innovations from the wild world of optics and photonics

August 2, 2015

Traditional computers manipulate electrons to turn our keystrokes and Google searches into meaningful actions. But as components of the computer processor shrink to only a few atoms across, those same electrons become unpredictable ...

Shedding light on millipede evolution

August 2, 2015

As an National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded entomologist, Virginia Tech's Paul Marek has to spend much of his time in the field, hunting for rare and scientifically significant species. He's provided NSF with an inside ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.