Sturgeon threatened with extinction

September 22, 2005

Sturgeon, the fish that produce black caviar, are at the brink of extinction, Miami researchers reported Thursday.

"I could not recommend people eat caviar from any wild population of sturgeon," Ellen Pikitch, director of the Pew Institute for Ocean Science at the University of Miami, told The New York Times.

Pikitch is the lead author of a study published in Thursday's issue of the journal Fish and Fisheries.

The study -- the first global assessment of the sturgeon's threatened state -- noted the fish is protected by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, but illegal trade continues.

"Few viable sturgeon fisheries now remain," the researchers wrote. They said it takes 15 years for a sturgeon to reach reproductive age and then each fish typically spawns only every three or four years. As a result, they are expensive and time-consuming to raise in captivity.

Sturgeon have been caught for caviar since 500 B.C., Pikitch told the Times, and at one time caviar was so abundant it was served in bars "like beer nuts." But during the last century sturgeon in Europe, North America and Asia have been fished to the brink of extinction.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Endangered sturgeon fish flourishing in Wisconsin

Related Stories

WWF urges Romania, Bulgaria to protect wild sturgeon

June 18, 2013

Conservationist group WWF on Tuesday urged Romania and Bulgaria, home to the last viable wild sturgeon populations in the European Union, to protect the species, threatened by illegal fishing and caviar trade.

Recommended for you

NASA's space-station resupply missions to relaunch

November 29, 2015

NASA's commercial space program returns to flight this week as one of its private cargo haulers, Orbital ATK, is to launch its first supply shipment to the International Space Station in more than 13 months.

CERN collides heavy nuclei at new record high energy

November 25, 2015

The world's most powerful accelerator, the 27 km long Large Hadron Collider (LHC) operating at CERN in Geneva established collisions between lead nuclei, this morning, at the highest energies ever. The LHC has been colliding ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.