Solar storms continue to vex communication

September 12, 2005

An ongoing upsurge of solar activity may disrupt communications worldwide for the next couple of weeks.

Sun spots and geomagnetic storms began cropping up on the surface of the sun late last week and has caused scattered problems with electric power systems, radio communications and global positioning equipment.

The aurora borealis has been seen in the United States as far south as Arizona.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said one of the stronger flares observed on the solar surface erupted September 7. Solar radiation has ranged from the moderate S2 level up to severe S4.

Unstable conditions are expected for the next 10 to 11 days.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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