Printable Electronics Market To Surpass $7 Billion In Revenue in 2010…

September 2, 2005

According to a new report from NanoMarkets, an industry analyst firm, the market for printable electronics will generate estimated revenues of over $7 billion ($ US) in 2010 driven by demand for printable displays, RFID, photovoltaics, computer memory and other printable products. Information about the report, “Printable Electronics: Roadmaps, Markets and Opportunities” and a white paper can be accessed from the firm’s web site at www.nanomarkets.net .

NanoMarkets’ new report claims that the areas with the largest growth opportunities include printable displays which NanoMarkets projects to be a market worth over $3 billion ($US) in 2010, printable RFID which will be worth $2.2 billion, and computer memory and photovoltaics which will achieve more modest yet significant markets opportunities of almost $ 770 million and $580 million respectably. According to Lawrence D. Gasman, NanoMarkets’ Principal Analyst, “Once one printable electronics product proves itself in the marketplace, it will lend considerable credibility to the entire sector.”

The term “printable electronics” refers to circuitry created out of conductive polymer and nano-metallic inks using a wide variety of printing technologies, old and new. NanoMarkets’ report says that printable electronics offers compelling advantages over more conventional ways of producing electronic circuits. These include the ability to cost effectively mass produce products that could never be created using the old CMOS paradigm such as RFID tags that are inexpensive enough to replace bar codes, roll up displays or smart packaging that will allow companies to enhance their offerings and product lines. The report notes that ink-jet printing offers the potential to create specialized circuits in very small runs which will address the semiconductor industry's urgent need to reduce prototyping costs. Lastly, printable electronics will also enable companies to create new forms of consumer products embedded with intelligence or other features that will enhance revenue possibilities. All of this can be done with relatively modest upfront investments.

About the Report:

NanoMarkets ' new report provides a detailed analysis of market opportunities available to a wide range of companies who stand to benefit from developments in printable electronics. Such firms range from materials firms such as 3M, Cabot and DuPont that are actively pursuing this sector, through printing equipment firms such as Litrex and Dimatix, to manufacturers of actual printable products such as Cambridge Display Technology, Philips, Plastic Logic and Samsung. The report is based on in-depth interviews of firms throughout the entire value chain including materials, manufacturing, equipment, packaging and finished products companies.

The report includes an analysis of all the key sectors where printable electronics can be deployed and provides (1) insight into how printable electronics technology is likely to evolve over the coming decade, (2) forecasts through 2012 of all the applications markets where "printables" will generate significant revenues, including breakouts by end user type and specific products, (3) a guide to which companies are active in this space now and what they are doing and (4) a complete roadmap for the printable electronics market. The report will be essential reading for marketing and planning executives in the electronics, semiconductor and printing industry as well as to VCs and others that are investing in the printable electronics space.

Please visit www.nanomarkets.net for additional information.

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