Kodak WiFi camera to soon hit stores

September 30, 2005

Kodak has started shipping a new digital camera that is billed as the first WiFi camera on the consumer market.

Kodak said this week that the Easyshare-One has been getting rave reviews in the high-tech media and will be hitting store shelves in the coming days with a suggested retail price of $599.

The device comes equipped with a wireless card that works well with WiFi hot spots where vacationers and other casual photographers can transmit photos to friends and family via e-mail.

The camera also has 256 megabits of memory and the capacity to store 1,500 images.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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