Brits seek halt to Euro TV rule changes

September 20, 2005

Britain's IT industry has asked the European Commission to halt its review of broadcast legislation on the grounds proposed changes are premature.

The Register said Tuesday that the IT lobbying group Intellect contends that blanket changes to EU regulations won't work at the present time due to the continuing and rapid pace of advances in broadcast technology.

Intellect member Anthony Walker told the newspaper that the commission should step aside for the time being rather than possibly creating roadblocks to technological advances with its proposed TV Without Frontiers Directive.

"New audio-visual content services, made possible through innovation in digital technology and the internet, should be given time to evolve and develop rather than being shackled by premature and unnecessary regulation intervention by the EU," Walker stated.

Britain's government advisory board Broadband Stakeholders Group joined Intellect in the call for a halt to the TV Without Frontiers Directive.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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