Stem cell scientists share research

August 25, 2005

Top researchers into the use of embryonic stem cells gathered at Yonsei University in Seoul Thursday for a two-day symposium to share their findings.

Participants include 21 scientists from five nations -- the United States, Britain, Australia, Japan and Korea, the Korea Times reported. Among them are Seoul National University Professor Moon Shin-yong, who first cloned embryonic human stem cells in 2003 with his colleague Hwang Woo-suk, and Hal Broxmeyer of Indiana University, who discovered stem cells in umbilical cord blood and transplanted them into leukemia patients in the late 1980s.

Broxmeyer, a world-renowned researcher of blood cell production, was to lecture on the mobilization and homing of blood stem and progenitor cells.

In addition to lectures by the high-profile researchers, the two-day event will feature wide-ranging topics on both embryonic and adult stem cells, the report said.

Stem cells, which have the ability to become regular cells or develop into organs and tissues, are attracting huge interest for their therapeutic potential as well as stirring controversy over the use of human embryos.

Just days ago, U.S. researchers said they had devised a way of generating stem cells without the use of human embryos.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: You need this hole in the head—to be smart

Related Stories

You need this hole in the head—to be smart

July 15, 2015

University of Adelaide researchers have shown that intelligence in animal species can be estimated by the size of the holes in the skull through which the arteries pass.

New procedure to obtain induced pluripotent stem cells

June 10, 2015

For their ability to differentiate into other cell types, the embryonic stem cells hold a large potential in the medical industry.  Their use, however, poses ethical questions due to the fact that in order to obtain them, ...

You're as old as your stem cells

June 4, 2015

A special issue of Cell Stem Cell published on June 4 includes a collection of reviews and perspectives on the biology of aging.

Recommended for you

Innovations from the wild world of optics and photonics

August 2, 2015

Traditional computers manipulate electrons to turn our keystrokes and Google searches into meaningful actions. But as components of the computer processor shrink to only a few atoms across, those same electrons become unpredictable ...

Shedding light on millipede evolution

August 2, 2015

As an National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded entomologist, Virginia Tech's Paul Marek has to spend much of his time in the field, hunting for rare and scientifically significant species. He's provided NSF with an inside ...

Better together: graphene-nanotube hybrid switches

August 2, 2015

Graphene has been called a wonder material, capable of performing great and unusual material acrobatics. Boron nitride nanotubes are no slackers in the materials realm either, and can be engineered for physical and biological ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.