Moon orbits to cost tourists $100 million; Trips eyed for 2008

August 10, 2005
Earth\'s Moon

A U.S. company has reportedly announced plans to conduct tourist trips around the moon for a fare of $100 million.

Space Adventures of Arlington, Va., told the New York Times it expects to announce an agreement this week with Russian space officials to send two passengers on a voyage lasting 10 to 21 days, depending on its itinerary and whether the trip includes the International Space Station.

A roundtrip ticket will cost $100 million and the space tourists will travel with a Russian pilot. They will circle the moon and then return to Earth. The company said it expects moon trips to begin as early as 2008.

Eric Anderson, Space Adventures chief executive, told the Times his company estimates between 500 and 1,000 people in the world could afford such a trip.

"It's the same number of people who could afford to buy a $100 million yacht," said Anderson.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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