Men's IQs higher, but used differently

August 25, 2005

Controversial British psychologist Richard Lynn has determined men have bigger brains and higher IQs than women, the Daily Mail reported Thursday.

Lynn, of the University of Ulster, and Dr. Paul Irwing, a senior lecturer in organizational psychology at the University of Manchester, analyzed the results of more than 20,000 reasoning tests taken by university students around the world.

"These different proportions of men and women with high IQs may go some way to explaining the greater numbers of men achieving distinctions of various kinds of which a high IQ is required, such as chess grandmasters, Nobel prizewinners and the like," Lynn said.

However, he notes the brainpower is used differently among the genders.

"There is some evidence to suggest that, for any given level of IQ, women are able to achieve more than men, possibly because they are more conscientious and better adapted to sustained periods of hard work," he said.

Lynn previously stirred controversy when he claimed intelligence varies with race.

The report will be published by the British Journal of Psychology.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: 'Early-term' births significantly increase risk of preterm births, says study

Related Stories

Women still being left out of medical research: report

March 3, 2014

(HealthDay)—Two decades after the passage of a landmark law mandating that women be represented in government-funded medical research, a new report reveals that the world of science is still ignoring women's unique health ...

Why women quit breast cancer drugs early

December 9, 2011

Why do so many postmenopausal women who are treated for estrogen-sensitive breast cancer quit using drugs that help prevent the disease from recurring?

Men's and women's immune systems respond differently to PTSD

April 26, 2011

Men and women had starkly different immune system responses to chronic post-traumatic stress disorder, with men showing no response and women showing a strong response, in two studies by researchers at the San Francisco VA ...

Recommended for you

Force triggers gene expression by stretching chromatin

August 26, 2016

How genes in our DNA are expressed into traits within a cell is a complicated mystery with many players, the main suspects being chemical. However, a new study by University of Illinois researchers and collaborators in China ...

The sound of a healthy reef

August 26, 2016

A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) will help researchers understand the ways that marine animal larvae use sound as a cue to settle on coral reefs. The study, published on August 23rd in the ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.