Men's IQs higher, but used differently

August 25, 2005

Controversial British psychologist Richard Lynn has determined men have bigger brains and higher IQs than women, the Daily Mail reported Thursday.

Lynn, of the University of Ulster, and Dr. Paul Irwing, a senior lecturer in organizational psychology at the University of Manchester, analyzed the results of more than 20,000 reasoning tests taken by university students around the world.

"These different proportions of men and women with high IQs may go some way to explaining the greater numbers of men achieving distinctions of various kinds of which a high IQ is required, such as chess grandmasters, Nobel prizewinners and the like," Lynn said.

However, he notes the brainpower is used differently among the genders.

"There is some evidence to suggest that, for any given level of IQ, women are able to achieve more than men, possibly because they are more conscientious and better adapted to sustained periods of hard work," he said.

Lynn previously stirred controversy when he claimed intelligence varies with race.

The report will be published by the British Journal of Psychology.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Human ancestors could hold the key to early diagnosis of bone disease

Related Stories

Tightest job market ever for China's college grads

May 29, 2013

(AP)—Chemistry student Jiang Wenying graduated three years ago and decided the job market was so tough she might as well go back to school for a graduate degree. Now she's finding it even worse, in what looks to be China's ...

Male bias persists in female-rich science conferences

November 21, 2012

Women scientists in primatology are poorly represented at symposia organized by men, but receive equal representation when symposia organizers are women or mixed groups, according to research published November 21 in the ...

Soil samples reveal urban mercury footprints

July 19, 2011

Indianapolis, St. Louis, Detroit, Buffalo, Richmond and Providence – cities scattered across the eastern half of the United States – have something in common, all have coal-fired power plants. A new study from the ...

Nursing students map their way to understanding HIV

March 30, 2011

In the Faculty of Nursing, students are taught the importance of connecting with the community, and nursing professor Vera Caine has come up with a way for students to not only learn about working in the community, but also ...

Recommended for you

Perfectly accurate clocks turn out to be impossible

October 7, 2015

Can the passage of time be measured precisely, always and everywhere? The answer will upset many watchmakers. A team of physicists from the universities of Warsaw and Nottingham have just shown that when we are dealing with ...

The topolariton, a new half-matter, half-light particle

October 7, 2015

A new type of "quasiparticle" theorized by Caltech's Gil Refael, a professor of theoretical physics and condensed matter theory, could help improve the efficiency of a wide range of photonic devices—technologies, such as ...

How the stick insect sticks (and unsticks) itself

October 7, 2015

New research shows the fluid found on insects' feet does not help them adhere to vertical and inverted surfaces, as previously thought, but may in fact help them to unstick their feet more easily to allow greater control ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.