Long work hours: more injuries, illnesses

August 18, 2005

U.S. researchers say there's new evidence that overtime and long work hours result in more occupational injuries and illnesses.

A study appearing in the journal Occupational and Environmental Medicine says the injuries and illnesses have nothing to do with how hazardous the job is.

The researchers analyzed the responses of nearly 11,000 people to the annual National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The survey included questions about employment history, work schedules, and sick leave, covering the period between 1987 and 2000.

In total, 110,236 job records were analyzed and 5,139 work related injuries and illnesses were noted, with more than half occurring in jobs requiring extended working hours or overtime.

After adjusting for age, gender, type of industry and job, employees working overtime were 61 percent more likely to suffer a work related injury or illness than employees who did not work overtime.

Working at least 12 hours a day was associated with a 37 percent increased risk of injury or illness, while working at least 60 hours a week was associated with a 23 percent increased risk, compared with those who worked fewer hours.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Truth or fib? When kids say they're too sick for school

Related Stories

Male anorexia often goes undiagnosed, untreated

June 22, 2016

Eighteen months ago, Alex Levy, then 19, fell while rock-climbing, injuring his foot. He was midway through freshman year at college in California. Levy loved to hike, cycle and run. He played Ultimate Frisbee on a school ...

Study: Up to 1 in 5 trauma victims may die unnecessarily

June 17, 2016

Up to 1 in 5 people may be dying unnecessarily from car crashes, gunshots or other injuries, a stark conclusion from government advisers who say where you live shouldn't determine if you survive. The findings take on new ...

Recommended for you

First stars formed even later than previously thought

August 31, 2016

ESA's Planck satellite has revealed that the first stars in the Universe started forming later than previous observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background indicated. This new analysis also shows that these stars were the ...

Thunderstorms spread mercury pollution

August 31, 2016

In the southern United States, an afternoon thunderstorm is part of a regular summer day. But new research shows those storms might be doing more than bringing some scary thunder and lightning.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.