Study: U.S. high school science labs poor

Aug 10, 2005

A national study suggests the quality of science laboratory experiences is poor for most U.S. high school students.

However, the study by the National Academies' National Research Council says educators can improve the experiences by following four key principles of effective instruction.

Researchers said adoption of the four recommendations would make lab activities more likely to help students reach important goals of science education, including cultivating an interest in science, developing scientific reasoning skills, and mastering science subjects.

The four principles for effective science instruction:

Design science lab experiences with clear learning outcomes in mind.

Thoughtfully sequence lab experiences into science instruction.

Integrate learning science content and learning about the processes of science.

Incorporate ongoing student reflection and discussion.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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