Teenage creator of virus faces trial

July 5, 2005

A criminal trial against a teenager responsible for one of the worst computer viruses in history opened Tuesday in Verden, Germany.

The 19-year-old had sent his homemade worm "Sasser" around the world in May, 2004. The virus shut down computer systems all over the globe, causing airplanes and trains to stand still, the German daily "Sueddeutsche Zeitung" reported.

Because of the complexity and ferociousness of the virus, investigators believed the Mafia or a gang of criminal hackers lurked behind the scam. Instead, they traced "Sasser" to a teenager, Sven Jaschan, who operated out of the basement of his parents' house in a sleepy town in Lower Saxony.

The worm terrorized the world for about a week before security experts managed to contain the virus.

Jaschan faces charges of computer sabotage, data manipulation and company disruption. Because he was still a minor when the crime was committed, a prison term is not expected, the newspaper reported.

Today Jaschan continues to work with viruses -- as a trainee for a German anti-virus software company.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Virus Writing on the Increase

Related Stories

Virus Writing on the Increase

July 28, 2004

Sasser Worm the Major Irritant of 2004, but Netsky Worms Dominate Reports Sophos charts virus activity for first six months of 2004 A report published by Sophos, a world leader in protecting businesses against viruses ...

Recommended for you

'Material universe' yields surprising new particle

November 25, 2015

An international team of researchers has predicted the existence of a new type of particle called the type-II Weyl fermion in metallic materials. When subjected to a magnetic field, the materials containing the particle act ...

CERN collides heavy nuclei at new record high energy

November 25, 2015

The world's most powerful accelerator, the 27 km long Large Hadron Collider (LHC) operating at CERN in Geneva established collisions between lead nuclei, this morning, at the highest energies ever. The LHC has been colliding ...

New gene map reveals cancer's Achilles heel

November 25, 2015

Scientists have mapped out the genes that keep our cells alive, creating a long-awaited foothold for understanding how our genome works and which genes are crucial in disease like cancer.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.