Shuttle Launch: Analysis Continues, Date Unclear

July 14, 2005
Shuttle Launch: Analysis Continues, Date Unclear

Space Shuttle Program Deputy Manager Wayne Hale has announced more troubleshooting is necessary to determine why an Engine Cut-Off sensor gave intermittent readings during Wednesday's attempted launch of Space Shuttle Discovery.
NASA told today that even Sunday is an unlikely date for its Space Shuttle Discovery launch.

Image above: Lights on Launch Pad 39B put Space Shuttle Discovery in the spotlight after the rollback of the Rotating Service Structure (at left). Credit: NASA/KSC

The monitoring device protects a Shuttle's main engines by triggering them to shut down in the unlikely event fuel runs unexpectedly low. NASA launch regulations require that all four sensors work properly for liftoff. (To view a graphic showing the sensor's location at the bottom of the External Tank, click here.)

Hale predicted more information could be available Friday, after NASA and contractor engineering teams across the country have had more time to analyze data and come up with a more definitive plan.

The STS-114 crew will remain at Kennedy Space Center for the time being, continuing preparations, repeating some training and even taking some time to relax.

Source: NASA

Explore further: Walk the line: NASA studies physical performance after spaceflight

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