NASA honors former astronaut John Young

July 21, 2005

Space pioneer John Young has been named a NASA Ambassador of Exploration. The award, along with a commemorative moon rock, were presented Wednesday during a ceremony at the Houston Museum of Natural Science.

The awards remain the property of the National Aeronautical and Space Administration, but are displayed at a museum or educational institution of the recipient's choice.

NASA says the goal of the awards is to inspire a new generation of explorers.

Young was the first human to fly in space six times and launch seven times; six from Earth and once from the moon.

He is the only astronaut to pilot four different types of spacecraft, flying in the Gemini, Apollo and Space Shuttle programs.

Young is also the longest serving astronaut in history. The retired U.S. Navy captain and test pilot joined NASA in 1962 and retired last December.

Young served as chief of NASA's Astronaut Office for 13 years, and served eight years as an assistant and associate director of NASA's Johnson Space Center.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Weather reports on the Sun could lead to safer space travel

Related Stories

NASA releases Hubble memorable moments video

July 24, 2015

In celebration of the 25 years since the Hubble Space Telescope's April 1990 launch, NASA is releasing the second in a series of videos showcasing moments in Hubble's history that were memorable for Goddard's engineers and ...

A Wi-Fi reflector chip to speed up wearables

July 23, 2015

Whether you're tracking your steps, monitoring your health or sending photos from a smart watch, you want the battery life of your wearable device to last as long as possible. If the power necessary to transmit and receive ...

Recommended for you

Quantum matter stuck in unrest

July 31, 2015

Using ultracold atoms trapped in light crystals, scientists from the MPQ, LMU, and the Weizmann Institute observe a novel state of matter that never thermalizes.

Binary star system precisely timed with pulsar's gamma-rays

July 31, 2015

Pulsars are rapidly rotating compact remnants born in the explosions of massive stars. They can be observed through their lighthouse-like beams of radio waves and gamma-rays. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.