Study links bedroom TVs to low test scores

July 5, 2005

A new U.S. study finds that children with televisions in their bedrooms have lower scores on standardized tests.

Researchers from Stanford University and Johns Hopkins surveyed 350 third-graders from six Northern California public schools in 2000. They found that children with access to home computers did better than others on tests.

"This study provides even more evidence that parents should either take the television out of their child's room, or not put it there in the first place," said Dr. Thomas Robinson, director of the Center for Healthy Weight at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford.

Surprisingly, children with bedroom televisions reported spending more time on homework on the average, possibly because they have more trouble with schoolwork. The researchers suggested that their test scores might be related to getting less sleep.

The study was published in the July issue of the Annals of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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