No link to happiness and intelligence

Jul 16, 2005

A high level of intelligence does not correlate with happiness in childhood or old age, Scottish researchers found.

Edinburgh University researchers found more intelligent people get better life opportunities but also had higher expectations, according to the study published in the British Medical Journal.

The researchers examined 550 Scottish volunteers born in 1921, who had their IQs tested when they were age 11 and again at 80 years old, the BBC reported Friday.

"If you are 80 and healthy, then your satisfaction with how your life has turned out bears no relation to how you scored on an IQ test recently or 70 years ago," said Ian Deary of the University of Edinburgh.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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