Japan to learn cloning skills from S.Korea

July 19, 2005

Japan will study South Korea's legal guidelines on embryonic stem cell research for "therapeutic cloning" to shape its policy on the morally challenging issue.

South Korea is at the forefront of research into therapeutic cloning -- using embryonic stem cells to find cures for such ailments as Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injuries and juvenile diabetes, the Asahi Shimbun reported Tuesday.

The cells, which may someday be used to produce human "spare-part" tissue, are the next frontier in regenerative medicine.

Japan's government hopes to build on South Korean research in compiling its own guidelines on embryonic stem cell uses.

The ministry is inviting South Korean researchers to an experts' workshop in late July to discuss progress made in this field and to exchange ideas.

Japan, like many other nations, has banned human cloning, but the government's Council for Science and Technology Policy decided last year to permit stem cell creation for therapeutic research aimed at finding cures for diseases.

The guidelines will cover such issues as how to obtain unfertilized eggs and what diseases can be researched using this method.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Brains, Genes, and Primates: The future of higher research on the planet of the apes

Related Stories

Saving the snow leopard with stem cells

January 23, 2012

(PhysOrg.com) -- The survival of the endangered snow leopard is looking promising thanks to Monash University scientists who have, for the first time, produced embryonic stem-like cells from the tissue of an adult leopard.

Recommended for you

Magnetism at nanoscale

August 3, 2015

As the demand grows for ever smaller, smarter electronics, so does the demand for understanding materials' behavior at ever smaller scales. Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are building a unique ...

How the finch changes its tune

August 3, 2015

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. ...

Study calculates the speed of ice formation

August 3, 2015

Researchers at Princeton University have for the first time directly calculated the rate at which water crystallizes into ice in a realistic computer model of water molecules. The simulations, which were carried out on supercomputers, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.