2005 ITRS Meeting Assesses the IC Industry’s Rapid Advance into Nanotech

July 8, 2005

The advanced chip industry is moving rapidly into nanotechnology, a trend that will be presented by global experts at next week’s 2005 ITRS Public Conference of the draft 2005 International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS).

The ITRS summer meeting, scheduled from 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. July 13 at the San Francisco Marriott, will feature descriptions of emerging research devices and materials that explore nanotechnology potentials, along with the nanotech-related challenges faced by more established disciplines such as lithography, interconnect, and front-end processes.

“As a thematic topic for the latest Roadmap revision, the various working groups are paying special attention to industry assessments of technology needs in the nanometric domain,” said Linda Wilson, ITRS Managing Editor and a key conference organizer. “We’d like as many technologists as possible to attend the meeting, participate in the open forums, and network with the ITRS teams who are driving the Roadmap.”

A new edition to be released in December, the 2005 ITRS will contain extensive data and an assessment that have been developed by a consensus of more than 1000 industry experts from the US, Europe, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. The Roadmap guides industry suppliers and manufacturers in continuously improving the functionality and cost of semiconductors.

At the upcoming conference, ITRS teams will ask the audience for input on critical challenges to keeping the industry on its historic growth trend. The teams also will present potential solutions and identify areas of encouraging innovation. The ITRS teams invite audience participation in evaluating solutions that extend current processes, equipment sets, and architectures.

Examples and associated challenges of the industry’s continuing penetration into the nanotech realm – generally defined as device or circuit dimensions below 100 nm – are contained in ITRS presentations, such as:

-- Emerging Research Devices – This chapter explores the territory beyond “ultimate CMOS” and how various nanoelectronic architectures, molecular circuitries, and related technologies can progress from basic research into industry R&D. Risk assessment will be key in considering these devices for manufacturing.

-- Emerging Research Materials– This team continues the discussion of emerging research devices by evaluating the new possibilities and challenges of nanomaterials and their impact on such novel devices. Key to this presentation will be the properties of such materials.

-- Metrology – This discipline is so pervasive that resolving its challenges transport metrology beyond semiconductors and into other sectors of nanotech, such as biotechnology and nano-environmental. The presentation addresses metrology advancements for nanowires and nanoarchitectures, as well as the control issues involved in producing such structures.

-- Lithography – Maskless lithography (ML2) and molecular imprinting – along with extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUV) and innovations in immersion litho – will be discussed at the conference as near-term versus long-term requirements demand a shift of focus on solution sets for future lithography.

-- Front End Processes –Larger wafers face unprecedented technical challenges (meeting specifications over larger areas) and economic hurdles, especially for wafer, equipment and metrology suppliers. Defining the critical path for 450 nm is urgent, since the industry lags in meeting the historic 12-year development cycle for wafer conversion.

-- Interconnect – The interconnect team presents global wiring issues, the systems approach for solutions for future interconnects, and the most recent developments of dielectric technology.

-- RF and Analog/mixed-signal for Wireless Technologies– This team will discuss those technologies being developed to support future wireless communications, their risks and opportunities, and the intersection of silicon-based technology with semiconductors of alternative compounds and potential technologies.

The 2005 ITRS is jointly sponsored by five organizations representing key chip-producing regions of the world. They include the European Semiconductor Industry Association, Japan Electronics and Information Technology Industries Association, Korea Semiconductor Industry Association, Taiwan Semiconductor Industry Association, and the US Semiconductor Industry Association.

Explore further: IMEC launches industrial affiliation program to develop RF-CMOS for the 45nm era

Related Stories

Chip Industry Entering New Era

July 14, 2005

In a keynote speech today at SEMICON West, Texas Instruments executive and SIA representative to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) Roadmap Committee, Dr. Bob Doering, will discuss critical issues ...

Broadening uses put MEMS technology on the map(s)

May 25, 2011

Behind the smart phone's continuing transformation into the quintessential multipurpose tool is the rise and diversification of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), tiny machines that work the speakers, projectors, gyroscopes ...

From massive supercomputers come tiniest transistors

March 4, 2015

A relentless global effort to shrink transistors has made computers continually faster, cheaper and smaller over the last 40 years. This effort has enabled chipmakers to double the number of transistors on a chip roughly ...

Recommended for you

'Material universe' yields surprising new particle

November 25, 2015

An international team of researchers has predicted the existence of a new type of particle called the type-II Weyl fermion in metallic materials. When subjected to a magnetic field, the materials containing the particle act ...

New gene map reveals cancer's Achilles heel

November 25, 2015

Scientists have mapped out the genes that keep our cells alive, creating a long-awaited foothold for understanding how our genome works and which genes are crucial in disease like cancer.

CERN collides heavy nuclei at new record high energy

November 25, 2015

The world's most powerful accelerator, the 27 km long Large Hadron Collider (LHC) operating at CERN in Geneva established collisions between lead nuclei, this morning, at the highest energies ever. The LHC has been colliding ...

A blue, neptune-size exoplanet around a red dwarf star

November 25, 2015

A team of astronomers have used the LCOGT network to detect light scattered by tiny particles (called Rayleigh scattering), through the atmosphere of a Neptune-size transiting exoplanet. This suggests a blue sky on this world ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.