New German coal power plant to capture CO2

July 3, 2005

New Swedish technology to capture and store waste carbon dioxide will be used to build a new German coal-fired power plant.

Vattenfall, a Swedish company, which owns coal mines and power stations in Germany, plans to start construction next year.

The technology being developed is designed primarily for use with lignite, or brown coal, which is one of eastern Germany's primary mineral resources.

"We believe coal has a future," project leader Markus Sauthoff told the BBC. He said it would also help German profits within the European Union's carbon dioxide trading system.

Launched on Jan 1, 2005, the plan allows European companies that emit less carbon dioxide than allowed under set quotas can sell unused allotments, or credits to those who overshoot the target.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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