Study says drink beer for the health of it

July 9, 2005

Food staples at baseball games can also be life-savers, the American Chemical Society said.

Studies published in the organization's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry reveal that some food found at baseball games and other sporting events contain compounds that are good for the body.

The studies found that sunflower seeds lower blood pressure, beer reduces the risk of a heart attack, sauerkraut fights cancer and onions prevent osteoporosis.

The study points out that all of those items should still be consumed in moderation

The American Chemical Society, based in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio, is a nonprofit organization made up of more than 158,000 chemists and chemical engineers.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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