Aussie museum displays huge dinosaur bones

July 20, 2005

Paleontologists in Brisbane, Australia, were proudly exhibiting Wednesday what they say is the largest group of dinosaur bones ever found in Australia.

The news media event marked the first time the bones have been displayed since being found on a grazing property near Winton in western Queensland last year, the Australian Broadcasting Corp. reported.

The 80 bones are from the cretaceous sauropod, including feet-long ribs, toes and shoulder and hip bones, scientists said.

The sauropods were four-legged, plant-eating dinosaurs more than 100-feet (30 meters) tall and up to 100-feet long. They had extremely long necks and tails and disproportionately small heads, Queensland Museum officials said.

"These are beautifully preserved bones, these are sauropod dinosaur bones, they are the best preserved of their kind in Australia," museum paleontologist Scott Hocknull said. "We're talking about the largest of the large, the biggest dinosaurs that roamed this continent."

The bones are estimated to be at least 95 million years old.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Time travel with the molecular clock

Related Stories

Time travel with the molecular clock

November 23, 2015

Migration isn't a new phenomenon, but new insights suggest that modern-day Europeans actually have at least three ancestral populations. This finding was published by Johannes Krause and prominently featured on the cover ...

Thighbone of giant dinosaur revealed

November 12, 2015

The DST_NRF Centre of Excellence in Paleosciences and the Evolutionary Studies Institute (ESI) at Wits University revealed its latest dinosaur find yesterday, 10 November 2015 at the Origins Centre.

New Mexico museum unveils rare fossil find

November 6, 2015

Paleontologists with the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science unveiled the first baby Pentaceratops skull ever discovered as hundreds of people lined up to get a look.

National Guard airlifts dino fossils out of wilderness

October 29, 2015

This was something that had never been seen before—the full skeletal remains of a baby Pentaceratops, a plant-eating dinosaur with large horns that once roamed what is now North America tens of millions of years ago.

Recommended for you

Exploring the physics of a chocolate fountain

November 24, 2015

A mathematics student has worked out the secrets of how chocolate behaves in a chocolate fountain, answering the age-old question of why the falling 'curtain' of chocolate surprisingly pulls inwards rather than going straight ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.