ARM Demonstrates Highest Performance ARM11 Family Processor

July 13, 2005

ARM has recently demonstrated the first test chip of its ARM11 MPCore synthesizable processor which has demonstrated performance equivalent to a 1.2GHz ARM11 family processor, with power consumption of approximately 600mW while delivering 1440 DMIPS of aggregate performance.

The test chip, which comprises four processors running with cache coherence, was constructed using a generic 130nm technology with no process optimizations for performance or power, and achieved this high-performance and scalability with existing applications developed for non-multiprocessing system technology. It features a full Linux SMP OS port and applications, and shows the automatic balancing of application loads among processors with overall reduction of consumed energy.

The ARM11 MPCore processor test chip is "right-first-time" and is the result of an ongoing collaboration between ARM and NEC to co-develop a next-generation multiprocessor core based on Symmetric Multi-Processing (SMP).

The ARM11 MPCore test chip demonstration platform is available to ARM Partners now, for evaluation and solution development.

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